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Guillaume Piletartist sheet 40/55

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This eclectic artist produces sculptures, paintings, photos and videos. Over the past few years, performance has occupied a more and more significant place in his work.

PerformanceProcess Paris, Centre Culturel Suisse 18.09-13.12.15
tue 20 Oct 2015
1
18h
La Mesure harmonique, De l'humain applicable aux règles transgressées de la peinture étendue à l'espace (création)Centre culturel suisse+33 1 42 71 44 50

Presented in the Focus Guillaume Pilet

This eclectic artist produces sculptures, paintings, photos and videos. Over the past few years, performance has occupied a more and more significant place in his work. For the CCS, he has designed an on-going performance taking place over the space of five days. Each day, a performer, entirely painted with coloured stripes by the artist, plays a script, which prompts interactions with the audience and leads him to grab a set of instruments to make a giant “live” painting.
With support from the City of Lausanne and the Canton de Vaud.

wed 21 Oct 2015
1
13h
La Mesure harmonique, De l'humain applicable aux règles transgressées de la peinture étendue à l'espace (création)Centre culturel suisse+33 1 42 71 44 50
thu 22 Oct 2015
1
13h
La Mesure harmonique, De l'humain applicable aux règles transgressées de la peinture étendue à l'espace (création)Centre culturel suisse+33 1 42 71 44 50
fri 23 Oct 2015
1
13h
La Mesure harmonique, De l'humain applicable aux règles transgressées de la peinture étendue à l'espace (création)Centre culturel suisse+33 1 42 71 44 50
sat 24 Oct 2015
1
13h
La Mesure harmonique, De l'humain applicable aux règles transgressées de la peinture étendue à l'espace (création)Centre culturel suisse+33 1 42 71 44 50
sun 25 Oct 2015
1
13h
La Mesure harmonique, De l'humain applicable aux règles transgressées de la peinture étendue à l'espace (création)Centre culturel suisse+33 1 42 71 44 50

Exhibitions

This eclectic artist produces sculptures, paintings, photos and videos. Over the past few years, performance has occupied a more and more significant place in his work.

60 years of performance art in Switzerland museum Tinguely, 20.09.2017 - 28.01.2018

De Pictura (2017)

La Mesure harmonique, de l’humain applicable aux règles transgressées de la peinture étendue à l’espace, paper prints based on photos of the artist's performance at the Centre culturel suisse in 2015, directly put up on the wall.

Guillaume Pilet develops a progressive, five day-long performance for the exhibition PerformanceProcess 2015 at the Centre culturel suisse in Paris. Every day a performer painted by the artist in colorful zebra stripes interprets a predefined protocol and realizes a giant painting live and on site.

PerformanceProcess Paris, Centre culturel suisse 18.09-13.12.15

Lettre à Messieurs les architectes (2015)

Lambda print, acrylic glass, 90×60 cm

extraball

symposium

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biography

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Guillaume Pilet, La Mesure harmonique (2015)

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A sense of measure

After becoming interested in the figure of the monkey, Guillaume Pilet has drawn inspiration from Brazilian modernism to develop new experiments in painting and performance art. ...

After becoming interested in the figure of the monkey, Guillaume Pilet has drawn inspiration from Brazilian modernism to develop new experiments in painting and performance art.

Performance art has always occupied a central place in Guillaume Pilet's multi-facetted work. He likes to be precise in terms of the references he uses, focusing on historic forms and repurposing them to fit the context. Begun during a trip to Brazil when he was exhibiting at the Kunsthalle in São Paulo in 2014, the new performance series entitled La Mesure harmonique draws its inspiration from the tropical roots of Brazilian modernism.

Guillaume Pilet has always used a wide variety of different references in his work and drawn inspiration from his surroundings: he works at the crossroads of his interests in primatology, ethnology, modernist architecture, concrete art, literature, poetry and contemporary music. That's why, when he went to Brazil, he had a copy of Le Corbusier's Modulor in his luggage. But these architectural theories take on a new dimension when seen through the tropical prism. Some even have practical applications, like the Dom-Ino principle, where the hot climate of São Paulo means that supporting walls can be replaced by large glazed windows open to the exterior. The full meaning of the social dimension of architecture became clear to Pilet, and major personalities such as Lina Bo Bardi joined his hall of fame.

As concrete art has many followers in Brazil, Guillaume Pilet found motifs he could play around with in his Shape Canvases. These became freer forms via freestyle drawings inspired by wave motifs (bossa), reminiscent of Brazilian landscape architect and artist Roberto Burle Marx's famous mosaic on the promenade at Copacabana. The wave then became a Warburgian motif drawn from many cultures and periods—from its use in vernacular and primitive representations to its optical exaggeration in tropicalist psychedelicism. Unconsciously modelling himself on Burle Marx, Guillaume Pilet picked up leaves from endemic tropical vegetation the first time he went for a walk in São Paulo. The very history of Brazilian culture is discovered and redigested in these free sources of inspiration, as prescribed in Cannibal Manifesto by the poet and novelist Oswald de Andrade. In this way, the social dimension of Brazilian modernism challenges the artist and becomes a meeting point for his various influences, as evidenced in his exhibition Sintesé Humanista in São Paulo.

Guillaume Pilet is now using body painting for the first time. His interest focuses on cultural minorities and certain Amazon tribes for whom body painting has a ritual and symbolic meaning. He is especially drawn to the Xingu Indians who use stylised animal motifs, each person having his own formal vocabulary. In his performances, the performer is first painted so that the wave motif follows the lines and curves of his body. It becomes hard to distinguish the man behind the pattern, and by the same token his nudity becomes irrelevant. The body really does become a living medium for painting, donning the motif so that it can dissolve and then appear unexpectedly in space. The performer has to execute a number of sequences designed by the artist, first relatively spontaneous, then gradually more and more complex. These are postures and choreographed movements relating to the space, its architecture and its décor. La Mesure harmonique, of which Guillaume Pilet will be presenting a new version for five days at the CCS, is a work in progress that takes into account the social context of the artist and his public appearance in the exhibition space: both on a human scale and in terms of the interaction that occurs between painting, a motif, a body, a building, and an audience.

 

Tiphanie Blanc, art critic and freelance curator

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